Your child’s Pertussis Vaccine Schedule

Hi there! If you aren’t following The Vaccine Mom Facebook page then you haven’t been getting nearly all of the important information I put up. I’m sorry because that’s not fair to you. So, I’m going to post all these little tidbits of information here on the website for all to see! Today is about … Read moreYour child’s Pertussis Vaccine Schedule

Vaccines and pregnancy

The CDC recommends the pertussis (whooping cough) and flu vaccines during every pregnancy.

The pertussis vaccine is particularly important during pregnancy. Pertussis can be life-threatening to your newborn.

The pertussis vaccine (most commonly given in the Tdap vaccine–includes tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis) should given between 27-32 weeks gestation. The earlier the better. It will take at least two weeks for your body to make antibodies and pass them to your unborn child. Getting the vaccine around 27 weeks allows enough time for antibodies to form just in case you go into labor early.

These antibodies will normally protect the newborn until he is able to get his DTaP vaccine at 2 months (in the US).

Make sure you get this vaccine during EVERY pregnancy. The vaccine is mainly given to protect the child. You must get it every pregnancy to protect each child from pertussis. And it is safe for you to do so.

Next up…the flu shot. It is safe and recommended by the CDC to get the flu shot during pregnancy.

Read moreVaccines and pregnancy

How to protect your newborn from whooping cough

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With coughing so severe it could crack your baby’s ribs, pertussis (whooping cough) can be life-threatening to children under the age of one. But, your baby doesn’t get his first pertussis vaccine until he is 2 months old, so how do you protect him from this horrible and life-threatening disease in the first few months of his life?

The answer is easy and it doesn’t even require you stick your newborn with any needles. You can get the Tdap vaccine, the vaccine that protects against tetanus, diphtheria, and (acellular) pertussis, during pregnancy and your newborn will be born protected from whooping cough until he is old enough to get the vaccine at two months.

Read moreHow to protect your newborn from whooping cough

Varicella (chickenpox) Vaccine

Chickenpox
Goldie Locks has Chicken Pox

I don’t know about you, but I REMEMBER getting the chickenpox as a young child. It was itchy and awful. And oatmeal baths! Oh, the oatmeal baths!!

Because this is most often a children’s disease, I thought it would be appropriate to litter this post with the some of the cute photos from one of my daughter’s favorite children’s books: Goldie Locks has Chicken Pox by Erin Dealey, illustrated by Hanako Wakiyama. 

Although the illustrator makes chicken pox look cute, it’s anything but. Thankfully, due to the vaccine our kids don’t ever need to experience the chickenpox…

Chickenpox is caused by a virus called the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), which is part of the herpesvirus family. The same virus that causes chickenpox can cause shingles later in life. The virus is called varicella when it causes chickenpox, then the virus hides in your body and it gets called zoster when it flares back up and causes shingles. There is also a vaccine for shingles called the zoster vaccine, which you may get should you choose to at around the age of 65 (but, that’s for another post).

Read moreVaricella (chickenpox) Vaccine