Tag Archives: mmr

Measles kills. Vaccines save lives!

Measles is 6 times more contagious than influenza. Around 400 people die from measles EVERY DAY worldwide. Measles is one of the leading killers of children on this planet. (As reported by the Measles & Rubella Initiative.)

As of the beginning of the year to mid April the CDC has confirmed 61 people from ten different states (California, Florida, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Utah, and Washington) have tested positive for measles.

Let’s travel back in time…

2016: 70 cases across 16 states

2015: 188 cases across 24 states

2014: 667 cases (record number) from 27 states

2008: Measles cases rise due to the increase of unvaccinated people.

Elimination (not eradication) of measles was documented in the United States in 2000. Only between 37 and 220 people were reported to have the measles each year.

Measles vaccines became routine in 1963.

Before 1963 measles infected millions of people each year and was responsible for hundreds of deaths. The CDC reports that 3-4 million people were infected every year. 

Back to today…

There is a good chance that someone will be diagnosed with measles TODAY in the United States.  It is a fact that hundreds of people on this planet will die from measles by nightfall. Many of these people will be babies and children–babies and children whose parents WISH they had access to vaccines that would have saved their lives.

Why not save your child? If you haven’t vaccinated your children what’s holding you back?

Please visit the Measles an Rubella Initiative to learn how you can help.

MMR Vaccine Rash

My son got his first Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccine (MMR) a little over two weeks ago. This vaccine has gotten a lot of negative press lately, but it really IS a great vaccine. One reason why it’s so great is because it contains weakened live viral particles. Live vaccines create the strongest immune response because they are most like the disease-causing virus. The not so fun part about a live vaccine is that, because they are most like the wild virus, the body often displays some of the symptoms of the disease. Many children experience these mild symptoms with the MMR vaccine:IMG_4870

 

  • Fever (up to 1 person out of 6)
  • Mild rash (about 1 person out of 20)
  • Swelling of glands in the cheeks or neck (about 1 person out of 75), which occurs less often after the second dose.
  • Temporary pain and stiffness in the joints, mostly in teenage or adult women (up to 1 out of 4)

Because it takes time for the body to create an immune response (that we can see), many of these symptoms do not show up until around two weeks after the injection. And to the DAY, my son developed several of these mild symptoms.

I’m sure my kids don’t appreciate this, but I always find their symptoms fascinating. That’s why you see a lot of pictures of my children’s symptoms–they get everything, by the way. And I’m often happy to see these signs as I know that their bodies are making the proper response to the injection. (I know, that’s odd.)

Anyway, he ran a fever for several days about two weeks after the injection, and then he developed the measles-like rash. The rash was red and raised, mostly on his torso and face. I am including a picture of his tummy.

I wanted to post this because so many people come to me wondering if this is a serious problem or a vaccine allergy. But, in the case of the above problems, no treatment is needed, and the symptoms should go away in several days. If the child is getting worse, however, it might be wise to consult your child’s doctor.

 

 

 

 

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccine (MMR)

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 9.48.28 PMThe measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine is safe. The end. Phew, that was easy!

Of course I’m only kidding. That’s definitely not the end, not even close. There’s so much information out there about the MMR vaccine—good and bad, informative, and plenty of opinions—that it’s hard to know what to believe. I’m not going to give you my opinion on the vaccine (although I’m sure you could guess), that’s for another post. These are the facts.

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