Influenza vaccine information for children under 8

Kiddos with the highest risk of complications from the influenza virus are those aged 0-5, and the CDC is recommending all children age 6 months and older get the flu shot this year and every year.

Children between the ages of 6 months and 8 years who are getting their FIRST flu shot will most likely need to have two doses a month apart.

The first dose is needed to “prime” the immune system and the second dose provides protection from the flu. (Children who do not get the second dose have much less or no protection from the flu.)

The first dose needs to be given as soon as the vaccine becomes available so that the second dose can be given in time to have protection at the peak of the season.

After that, the child will only need one dose per year for coverage.

Children under six months are unable to receive the vaccine, but there are still ways to offer them protection. First and foremost, urge everyone around your children under 6 months to get the vaccine to keep the flu from getting close. (Herd immunity, folks!) Also, follow those common-sense hand washing and germ-reducing rules you learned in elementary school!

And please, please, please…stay home when you’re sick. I can’t say that enough.

 

Fillable microparticles might be the future of vaccines

What?! 
 Here’s my take:
This is definitely an interesting idea, however I’m not sure they are close to being able to carry out this plan quite yet (in my opinion), but it’s definitely an incredible possibility.
 
So what’s going on here?
 
Based on the findings from the research of these new micro-capsules, the researchers believe they may be able to create a vaccine that releases the capsules into the body that biodegrade at just the right times to deliver each vaccine into the body.
 
What a cool idea to eliminate the stress and pain of multiple injections for the child throughout childhood!

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Vaccines 101

When a germ such as a virus or bacteria enters your body, your immune system goes into battle. It makes antibodies that locate the germ and launches an attack to fight it off.

After the antibodies have attacked they stick around in the body to protect you if the same germ enters your body again.

Often the antibodies can stop an infection by the remembered germ should it enter your body again. The infection is stopped before you even show signs of being sick! Continue reading

A story about viral meningitis

Me and my mom (2008)

Meningitis is no joke.

There are all sorts of things that can cause this nasty inflammation (swelling) of the membranes covering the brain, such as a bacterial or vial infection, injury, cancer, certain drugs, among other types of infection.

We have the Meningitis B Vaccine to protect against meningococcal group B bacteria-causing meningitis–a very nasty and potentially deadly form of meningitis. (Bacterial meningitis requires immediate medical attention.)

We also have several vaccines that can help protect from viral meningitis–an often less severe form of meningitis, however still very serious.

This is the story of when my mother contracted viral meningitis… Continue reading

Be the herd!

When a large portion of a community gets vaccinated they create a herd of immune people around those who are unable to be vaccinated, such as people with compromised immune systems, infants, and pregnant women.
 
By having a high number of vaccinated people in the community, these people who aren’t able to get their vaccines are more likely to be protected from disease.
 
You may think that if your child is left unvaccinated they will be protected by the herd. Well…how many other parents have thought the same thing?

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