Judah Maccabee Goes to the Doctor

 

There are far too few children’s books on vaccines. Too many children are scared and confused about vaccines and it’s time we start the dialog. Our little ones are curious creatures who could benefit from knowing more about why they have to roll up their sleeves for vaccines.

Today, there’s a new children’s book on the shelves that discusses the topic of vaccination: Judah Maccabee Goes to the Doctor.

Author Ann D. Koffsky offers lots to talk about in this interesting children’s book beautifully illustrated by Talitha Shipman. Continue reading

The Mumps: Emma’s story

The mumps is a highly contagious disease characterized by swollen and tender salivary glands on the sides of the neck. Not only is the mumps miserable, but it can cause some pretty serious complications and life-long consequences.
Even being so young when contracting the mumps, Emma remembers it vividly. You can see the characteristic swollen glands in the photo even through she’s smiling.
Here’s Emma’s story.
“I was born in 1979, so too early to be vaccinated against mumps. It was only in 1988 that the UK introduced its first vaccine against the disease, the MMR.

Continue reading

The Birthday Curse

My son, Stevie, is turning three in about ten days and here it is again, the birthday curse.

On his first birthday he contracted a nasty case of hand-foot-and-mouth that left him with open sores, finger and toe nails falling off, and a cancelled birthday party. And on his second birthday we were all throwing up from a stomach virus. So he’s turning three in a few days and it’s only appropriate that he come down with another case of hand-foot-and mouth.

What’s going on?! I’m convinced it’s the birthday curse. Or maybe it’s just the curse of the preschooler–they’re germy little buggers.

Hand-foot-and-mouth is a disease caused by multiple viruses and virus strains. There are at least seven strains of the coxsackievirus and at least one enterovirus that can cause the disease. So therefore, your little ones CAN get it again. Continue reading

Vaccines and pregnancy

The CDC recommends the pertussis (whooping cough) and flu vaccines during every pregnancy.

The pertussis vaccine is particularly important during pregnancy. Pertussis can be life-threatening to your newborn.

The pertussis vaccine (most commonly given in the Tdap vaccine–includes tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis) should given between 27-32 weeks gestation. The earlier the better. It will take at least two weeks for your body to make antibodies and pass them to your unborn child. Getting the vaccine around 27 weeks allows enough time for antibodies to form just in case you go into labor early.

These antibodies will normally protect the newborn until he is able to get his DTaP vaccine at 2 months (in the US).

Make sure you get this vaccine during EVERY pregnancy. The vaccine is mainly given to protect the child. You must get it every pregnancy to protect each child from pertussis. And it is safe for you to do so.

Next up…the flu shot. It is safe and recommended by the CDC to get the flu shot during pregnancy. Continue reading